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Monday, March 29, 2010

managing knowledge

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You Can't Manage Knowledge
By Wally Bock Platinum Quality Author


No matter what the Knowledge Management (KM) vendors say, you can't manage knowledge. To manage something you need to know what you've got and you need to measure it in some way.

You can't do either of those things with knowledge. The vast majority of knowledge is inside people's heads. The technical term for that is "tacit knowledge." And there's no clear way to evaluate how much there is or how well you're using it.

So, forget Knowledge Management and think about helping people solve problems. After all, that's what knowledge management is supposed to do. Design your support systems so they help people do what they already do naturally. If you're like most people, you probably use four sources of help to solve problems.

You probably start to solve a problem by mining your own mental resources. Have you dealt with something like this before? Does this problem remind you of another problem or situation? Do you know anyone who might be able to help you?

That takes us to a second source, your buddies. How often have you faced a problem and thought, "Who do I know that might know the answer to this?

Most often, the first person you call or email won't know the answer you're after. But he or she can put you on the trail of someone who does. Psychologist Stanley Milgram studied how this works. In his "small world experiments" he determined that you can find someone who can help you within six contacts. In popular jargon that's "six degrees of separation."

There are several technology tools you can use to help your people do this more efficiently. Social networking tools will help you identify connections.

Simple discussion groups and wikis help people get to know other people with specific expertise. Set us discussion boards or email discussion lists that help your people share shoptalk. In shoptalk groups, people learn about both their work and their peers. Both kinds of knowledge help at problem solving time.

Traditional databases can help your people solve problems. Use your formal databases, but supplement them with databases that can do free text searching so your people can search resumes and project reports for key words.

In today's world, you'll almost certainly look online for problem-solving information. In the Google Age, many people use the net as a main source of answers.

But Google should be just the start. Mine the web sites that you find with Google. Use Google to find experts that you can contact directly. Go a step farther. Visit Amazon and search for books on your topic. Note the authors. Search for them on the web. Read their books.

That's another source, printed material. Books and journal articles are great sources of information. Don't neglect them just because this is the "Digital Age." And don't forget that many older journals and books may not be online at all.

None of these sources stands alone. The magic is in the mix.

Your brain may call up the memory of your friend who is an engineer and who may be able to help. He or she may recommend a journal article that you find online or a book from Amazon or your friend's library.

In the real world, Knowledge Management isn't all about fancy technological systems. Effective knowledge management is a collection of tools that help your people discover and use their knowledge and the knowledge of their peers to do a better job of solving problems and building profits.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Wally_Bock

managing knowledge

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You Can't Manage Knowledge
By Wally Bock Platinum Quality Author


No matter what the Knowledge Management (KM) vendors say, you can't manage knowledge. To manage something you need to know what you've got and you need to measure it in some way.

You can't do either of those things with knowledge. The vast majority of knowledge is inside people's heads. The technical term for that is "tacit knowledge." And there's no clear way to evaluate how much there is or how well you're using it.

So, forget Knowledge Management and think about helping people solve problems. After all, that's what knowledge management is supposed to do. Design your support systems so they help people do what they already do naturally. If you're like most people, you probably use four sources of help to solve problems.

You probably start to solve a problem by mining your own mental resources. Have you dealt with something like this before? Does this problem remind you of another problem or situation? Do you know anyone who might be able to help you?

That takes us to a second source, your buddies. How often have you faced a problem and thought, "Who do I know that might know the answer to this?

Most often, the first person you call or email won't know the answer you're after. But he or she can put you on the trail of someone who does. Psychologist Stanley Milgram studied how this works. In his "small world experiments" he determined that you can find someone who can help you within six contacts. In popular jargon that's "six degrees of separation."

There are several technology tools you can use to help your people do this more efficiently. Social networking tools will help you identify connections.

Simple discussion groups and wikis help people get to know other people with specific expertise. Set us discussion boards or email discussion lists that help your people share shoptalk. In shoptalk groups, people learn about both their work and their peers. Both kinds of knowledge help at problem solving time.

Traditional databases can help your people solve problems. Use your formal databases, but supplement them with databases that can do free text searching so your people can search resumes and project reports for key words.

In today's world, you'll almost certainly look online for problem-solving information. In the Google Age, many people use the net as a main source of answers.

But Google should be just the start. Mine the web sites that you find with Google. Use Google to find experts that you can contact directly. Go a step farther. Visit Amazon and search for books on your topic. Note the authors. Search for them on the web. Read their books.

That's another source, printed material. Books and journal articles are great sources of information. Don't neglect them just because this is the "Digital Age." And don't forget that many older journals and books may not be online at all.

None of these sources stands alone. The magic is in the mix.

Your brain may call up the memory of your friend who is an engineer and who may be able to help. He or she may recommend a journal article that you find online or a book from Amazon or your friend's library.

In the real world, Knowledge Management isn't all about fancy technological systems. Effective knowledge management is a collection of tools that help your people discover and use their knowledge and the knowledge of their peers to do a better job of solving problems and building profits.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Wally_Bock

Saturday, March 27, 2010

knowledge base management

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Knowledge Base Software-Features

Why Knowledge Management?

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 Long before Knowledge Management became a term du jour, the industrialist giant, Andrew Carnegie, said, “The only irreplaceable capital an organization possesses is the knowledge and ability of its people. The productivity of that capital depends on how effectively people share their competence with those who can use it.” The author of modern management, Peter Drucker, wrote, “The basic economic resource—the means of production—is no longer capital, nor natural resources, nor labor. It is and will be knowledge.” Even the genius of Charles Darwin makes the point, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” In this age, the only constant is change. Beside the well known changes in technology, there are continuing changes politically, socially, and economically. The ability of an organization to stay current and stay relevant requires a core competence in Knowledge Management.

Knowledge Management can transform your organization to new levels of effectiveness, efficiency, and scope of operation. Through advancements in technology, data and information are readily available. The modern business manager is able to discover and learn new measures, new technologies, and new opportunities, but this requires the ability to gather information in usable formats and disseminate knowledge to achieve the organization’s objectives.

Knowledge Management is continually discovering what an organization knows—codifying tacit knowledge, Data Mining, and Business Intelligence; continually increasing what tcehe organization knows—organizational learning and communities of practice, and continually organizing and disseminating explicit knowledge for use throughout the organization.

source: http://www.knowledgemanagementgateway.com/

Friday, March 26, 2010

Management Knowledge

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No matter what the Knowledge Management (KM) vendors say, you can't manage knowledge. To manage something you need to know what you've got and you need to measure it in some way.
You can't do either of those things with knowledge. The vast majority of knowledge is inside people's heads. The technical term for that is "tacit knowledge." And there's no clear way to evaluate how much there is or how well you're using it.

So, forget Knowledge Management and think about helping people solve problems. After all, that's what knowledge management is supposed to do. Design your support systems so they help people do what they already do naturally. If you're like most people, you probably use four sources of help to solve problems.
You probably start to solve a problem by mining your own mental resources. Have you dealt with something like this before? Does this problem remind you of another problem or situation? Do you know anyone who might be able to help you?

That takes us to a second source, your buddies. How often have you faced a problem and thought, "Who do I know that might know the answer to this?

Most often, the first person you call or email won't know the answer you're after. But he or she can put you on the trail of someone who does. Psychologist Stanley Milgram studied how this works. In his "small world experiments" he determined that you can find someone who can help you within six contacts. In popular jargon that's "six degrees of separation."

There are several technology tools you can use to help your people do this more efficiently. Social networking tools will help you identify connections.

Simple discussion groups and wikis help people get to know other people with specific expertise. Set us discussion boards or email discussion lists that help your people share shoptalk. In shoptalk groups, people learn about both their work and their peers. Both kinds of knowledge help at problem solving time.
Traditional databases can help your people solve problems. Use your formal databases, but supplement them with databases that can do free text searching so your people can search resumes and project reports for key words.

In today's world, you'll almost certainly look online for problem-solving information. In the Google Age, many people use the net as a main source of answers.
But Google should be just the start. Mine the web sites that you find with Google. Use Google to find experts that you can contact directly. Go a step farther. Visit Amazon and search for books on your topic. Note the authors. Search for them on the web. Read their books.

That's another source, printed material. Books and journal articles are great sources of information. Don't neglect them just because this is the "Digital Age." And don't forget that many older journals and books may not be online at all.

None of these sources stands alone. The magic is in the mix.
Your brain may call up the memory of your friend who is an engineer and who may be able to help. He or she may recommend a journal article that you find online or a book from Amazon or your friend's library.
In the real world, Knowledge Management isn't all about fancy technological systems. Effective knowledge management is a collection of tools that help your people discover and use their knowledge and the knowledge of their peers to do a better job of solving problems and building profits.

knowledge management services

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Knowledge Management Services : Organizing Knowledge For Businesses
By Alexander Gordon

Knowledge management is about managing knowledge processes that are crucial for business operations. It involves creation, collection, dissemination, use, and organization of information. Knowledge management can be used either for the distribution or for use of existing knowledge or for the creation of new knowledge. Knowledge management programs involve developing knowledge collection, access to the knowledge, and a control mechanism for checking abuse of the knowledge.

Advantages of Knowledge Management Systems:

The need for knowledge management services emerged as a necessity due to the haphazard growth of information, decision support issues, data integration, and many other issues. We discuss why knowledge management services are not just advantageous but also crucial for any business.
1) Globalization:
In the era of globalization, knowledge is no longer limited to a special domain. It is diffused and stored in many different locations. To succeed in your business, you need to locate, store, and organize knowledge properly.
2) Profitability:
Knowledge, if properly packaged for relevant applications, is highly valuable. Companies pay a lot to obtain know-how that they can use to boost the cash flow.
3) Business Restructuring:
If changes are made in the organization model of the business, some of the knowledge gathered over the years may be lost in the restructuring process. Knowledge management services help organizations store crucial data.
4) Experience:
Companies can benefit greatly from the knowledge of older employees and put it to use in similar experiences.
Knowledge Management Process:
All knowledge management services follow roughly the following procedure to set up a comprehensive knowledge management system.
1) Delegating Responsibility to Knowledge Manager:
A knowledge manager creates and coordinates with a multidisciplinary team to gather and develop knowledge.
2) Developing Knowledge Centers:
A knowledge center develops strategies, expertise networks, and financial data planning.
3) Access:
Companies need to regulate access to knowledge, both to check misuse of knowledge and to ensure that the right information reaches the appropriate people. Knowledge management services help companies with this issue as well.
Knowledge Management Strategies:
Ideally, knowledge management strategies should enhance the knowledge collection, sharing, access, and use. This can be accomplished if:
1) The knowledge manager is committed to good knowledge management practices and can coordinate and motivate his team.
2) The knowledge management team has the support of the managers and other employees.
3) Clearly stated goals are very important if you want good knowledge management services.
4) Recognizing and rewarding good work is important, since it motivates the knowledge management team to reach higher.
Knowledge management services can enhance the bottom line; making it crucial for companies to hire knowledge management services from the outside if they have no internally appointed knowledge manager. Knowledge management services will put existing knowledge within reach of the right people and encourage creation of new knowledge.
 
Platinum Quality Author

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

knowledge management blog

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Importance of Knowledge Management in Business
By Ryan Mutt

Knowledge management (KM) is a term that stays vast and vivid from the day of its existence, which dates back in time. It is of much indulgence and given thought into, at organizational levels. It comprises of the methodology and practices that are put into use to accumulate differentiate, and arrange thoughts and insights of individuals at a constant rate. This is of great help and need to all, both at individual and in terms of a group or even at organizational context.

It is more of a discipline than just a thought or process. Management based structures, IT sectors, organizations with a tagline of business, all such formations have a separate concentration for knowledge management now, as it's importance and flow keeps increasing as each year passes by. KM goes hand in hand with learning process in an organizational structure, which is mostly thought to substitute the latter. But both are different and vivid in senses of their distinct values.

It helps facilitate innovative thoughts, sharing of beneficial work points and knowledge that would stay explicit, without such a discipline. Actively managing knowledge into common access points to make work and situations easy and comfortable is one point of support to KM from a vast bunch of thoughts. Acquiring for knowledge is never an easy or effortless job. They have to be extracted and accumulated through different sources in vivid ways known. Providing rewards, persuasion through mechanisms and ideas that would encourage the source to providing information, reviews provided on such accumulations, usefulness of repositories, all, constitute to how successful the knowledge management is.

The actual purpose of knowledge management cannot be enclosed into a nutshell, because the term lays vast. Purposes are to improve relations between individuals, higher and improved rate of connectivity, solving disputed problems with ease and outstanding outcomes, increasing the know-how of individuals and groups across the sector or organization as a whole, to mention a few. Blogs and yellow pages are examples, which bring the actual picture of knowledge management to light.

Knowledge management is still growing and has now become an integral and unavoidable part of society as a whole. Intranets, data warehouse, group conferencing, etc. forms what can be put simple and straight, i.e. knowledge management. It has a scope that keeps increasing with each second passing by. The actual reason for such a vast scope is, because knowledge never ends, but keeps increasing, and modified with new inputs and outcomes in the global market and world as a whole.

 
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Knowledge Management Tools

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Knowledge Management Tools
By Kristy Annely

Knowledge Management Tools

A variety of software tools have come into existence for the management of knowledge called Knowledge Management Tools. These Knowledge Management Tools generally provide features such as intranet, logged chat, search, FAQ lists, personalization, database maintenance and so on. All these supposedly help the process of knowledge sharing within an organization. The development of technology has resulted in facilities such as the Internet, search engines, group support systems, portals, data warehouses and the use of artificial intelligence techniques. This is very useful in managing large databases of knowledge and providing access to them from anywhere in the world. It is in this regard that software tools provide valuable assistance to knowledge management systems.

The question of managing and keeping track of myriad documents in an establishment, searching for a certain piece of knowledge from a huge knowledge base, or providing customer service round the year, 24/7, is resolved through software tools that help organize and manage knowledge.

Knowledge management tools have the advantage of the existing information technology infrastructure in any organization. With the evolution of the IT industry, companies are keen to empower their employees with access to information, intranets, document management tools and full text indexing tools, to name a few, as called for by knowledge management. It follows, therefore, that employing those technologies in knowledge management has encouraged the development of knowledge management tools . Knowledge management is nothing but a collection of technologies used for authoring, indexing and storing data, and for the application of this information and knowledge, where applicable.

Knowledge is an invaluable advantage for organizations, and the security of this knowledge has to be addressed by all tools used in the management of this knowledge. No matter what the type or format of knowledge, it has to be stored in repositories. All tools that sustain these repositories must have shared features such as regulation, storage, search and recovery, content delivery and content evolution.

Knowledge Management Systems

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Knowledge Management Systems

Monday, March 22, 2010

knowledge management solutions

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Did you think Knowledge is the fundamental asset for your organization? if so, Knowledge Management Solutions may be your correct choice.
Bellow is nice article, explain why your organization need Knowledge Management Solution.
Knowledge Management Challenges

knowledge management solution

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Knowledge Management: More Than Just Know-how!
By Chris Collison

People sometimes interchange the terms "know-how" and "knowledge", but there's a world of difference! Systems vendors are falling over themselves to sell you so-called "integrated knowledge management solutions", but these are rarely more than glorified information management systems with go-faster stripes.
If we fail to understand knowledge in all its facets, then there is a danger that in doing so we miss out on the most valuable aspects of knowledge management and end up delivering a system-driven solution, rather than a cultural shift towards sharing and learning from experience.

Know-how is the processes, procedures, techniques and tools you use to get something done. This kind of knowledge can?t always be captured in its entirety - imagine trying to write down your know-how on "how to ride a bicycle"! Some things are simply best learned from combination of know-how and experience.

Know-why relates to strategic insight - understanding the context of your role, and the value of your actions. It's the "big picture" view of things. Why are we doing this? Where are we trying to get to? What would happen if we didn't do it? Where do I fit in all of this?

Think back to your first ever job. Did anyone explain to you why what you did was important, or were you just expected to "get on with it" and not ask stupid questions? Know-why is a key to lifting morale and generatingcommitment and buy-in from staff.

Know-what is the facts required to complete a task, it's the information needed in order to take a decision and it's the things you  need to collect together before making something. This kind of knowledge can be captured and embedded into systems, scripts and processes.

Know-who includes knowledge about relationships, contacts, networks, who to call on for help. It's the "I know a man who can" factor. All of us apply and build up this type of knowledge on a day-to-day basis, often subconsciously. If your role is sales-oriented, you'll know just how important know-who can be. The degree to which the know-who in your organisation can be accessed will be a reflection of your culture.

How easy is to find the right people?
When you do find them, are they willing to give you the benefits of their experience?
Are networks and communities of practice supported and encouraged in your
organisation?

Know-where is that uncanny ability that some people have for navigating through and finding the right information. You probably know people in your office who fulfil this role, functioning like human search engines! In his bestseller "The Tipping Point", Malcolm Gladwell describes these people as connectors. If you visit Yahoo!, or one of the other major Internet portals, you?ll be in a knowledge-rich environment where most of the content is know-where - links to where relevant  know-how (and often know-who) can be found on the web.

Finally Know-when is the sense of timing - to know the best time to do something, to make a decision, or to stop something.

Conclusion
Knowledge is a many faceted gem - to truly extract the value, you will need to look beyond "know-how", and polish-up your organisation's performance in a wider range of areas. By doing this, you will move far closer to having an integrated strategy for managing knowledge.

Sunday, March 21, 2010

Knowledge Management Applications

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Knowledge Management Applications and Tools
knowledge management application

Knowledge Management Programs

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Knowledge Management Programs

Knowledge Management Software

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knowledge management software
Knowledge management and Knowledge Management Software comes with its own challenges, such as identifying information that meet the "valuable" criteria. Not all information can be classified as knowledge, nor can all knowledge be considered valuable. Put simply, the secret is to separate the wheat from the chaff.

People are at the core of what knowledge management and Knowledge Management Software  is all about. It is directly related to people's knowledge and how that knowledge can support business and organizational goals. It draws heavily on human creativity, innovation, motivation, intuition, ideas and competence. It is not technology-based, although technology is used to support knowledge management and Knowledge Management Software drives.

Knowledge management and Knowledge Management Software  is very organized and goal-oriented, and has a direct link to the strategic goals of the business. It employs knowledge that is relevant, meaningful and practical. Knowledge management and Knowledge Management Software is not static but ongoing, not the least because knowledge keeps changing and needs to be updated, revised and sometimes done away with.

If a business needs an application to create, manage and share business knowledge, or if it needs to manage its business intelligence more efficiently, then knowledge management software may be just the thing for that business. Although knowledge sharing is a relatively old concept, it is only now that it is becoming a formalized business practice. Knowledge management software assists the process of managing and propping up the storehouse of knowledge by accessing human and organizational capital.

Knowledge management software uses an organization's intellectual capital to present an effective way to excavate, manage and share these resources. Knowledge management software also allows for the efficient management of self-service customer support, FAQ management, help desk knowledge foundation, document and project management. This software supports the sharing of the best practices in business, directing educated business decisions, and can also serve as the principal means of internal communication.

Some of the benefits of using knowledge management software include greater employee efficiency and productivity, improved customer satisfaction, competitive advantages and pioneering self-service giving rise to increased satisfaction. Knowledge management software is easily available. Therefore, it is always good to identify your requirements and install a trial version before settling for the final software solution.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Knowledge Management Software

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Knowledge Management now is getting very high attention in Organizations. Since, nowadays turbulent economics with very high competition and unpredictable environment. Many Organization now focusing on how thet capture, store, retain, and share knowledge in Organization. However, Many Organization still confuses, what software that organization should installed to implement Knowledge Management?
knowledge management software

Bellows are recommended knowledge management software for your organization:
  1. Knowledge Power Solution that focused on the ITSM (IT Service Management), Service Management and CRM markets. The KPS solution typically deploys in inbound customer service desks to empower the agents or web self service users to draw from your Knowledge Base to answer questions regarding IT problems. Increasingly councils and local authorities are using information retrieval to answer generic questions and to help with solution managemen. Further information you can access here.
  2.  Interspire Knowledge Manager allows you to share information from your website or Intranet with an enterprise-grade knowledge base, reducing customer support, improving staff productivity and eliminating time wasted searching for information across disparate systems such as shared folders and paper documents. Further information you can access here